niaollhoran asked: dennys why would i want to eat nachos for breakfast

dennys:

pls do not even come at me right now with this kind of attitude why wouldn’t you want to eat nachos 24/7 why wouldn’t you want to enjoy your life to the fullest come on “niaoll” be the breakfast change you want to see in the world!

(Reblogged from sosayethallie)

reblog if you were born in 1985 or earlier

riallasheng:

iandsharman:

sarkastically:

penemuel:

emmagrant01:

vixyish:

anghraine:

for science

This has depressingly few notes.

Gen X, represent.

considerably before 1985…

1982.

I was 9 in 1985…

…I’m the eldest and all of my younger sibs predate 1985.

(Reblogged from montanaharper)
acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

(Source: pleatedjeans)

(Reblogged from montanaharper)

Linden Ashby and Susan Walters at the MTV Movie Awards.

(Source: maliastate)

(Reblogged from pcpatty)

after18eighteen:

tastefullyoffensive:

Goat GIFs [x]

Previously: Animals Stealing Food

Why did nobody tell me that goats are so funny?

(Reblogged from shadowhuntress)

awesomethingseastoftroost:

These shots of Blackwell’s Thrift Shop come from Laura Spencer, KCUR arts reporter. 

"I was driving back to the station and thought I’d take a few photos of one of my favorite shop windows east of Troost: Blackwell’s Thrift … I’ve always loved their colorful display of vases, in many shapes and sizes," Laura writes.

"Plus, it’s in a building from the 1920s, ones that you’ll see along Troost, Paseo, Gillham Rd., etc."

Blackwell’s, which is located at 1316 E 63rd St. in Kansas City, also gets a nod in the Pitch for its vintage collectibles.

"Plan no less than an hour to wander the aisles of Blackwell’s," the Pitch advises.

(Reblogged from awesomethingseastoftroost)

witchyredhead:

It’s the way she casually picks up her heels after beating the shit out of everyone in the room.

I can never not reblog this scene. It’s my favourite thing.

(Source: darlingdukeofsuffolk)

(Reblogged from montanaharper)
  • me at home: i've been wearing the same jeans and band shirt for the last three weeks but it still smells alright so i'll keep wearing it
  • me going away: I NEED ONE SHIRT FOR EACH DAY AND EXTRA IN CASE IT GETS DIRTY AND THE SAME AMOUNT OF JEANS AND SOCKS ACTUALLY NO I'LL NEED EXTRA SOCKS IN CASE IT FLOODS AND DOUBLE THE UNDERWEAR IN CASE OF DISASTER AND ONE NICE OUTFIT IN CASE I GET INVITED TO TEA WITH THE QUEEN
(Reblogged from shadowhuntress)

littlepersistentkid:

littlepersistentkid:

Tyler Hoechlin | Wolfsbane | on early seasons Derek

image

just going to add this nowimageimage

(Reblogged from shadowhuntress)

dbvictoria:

Eddie Izzard appreciation post

(Reblogged from shadowhuntress)
Socializing is as exhausting as giving blood. People assume we loners are misanthropes just sitting thinking, ‘Oh, people are such a bunch of assholes,’ but it’s really not like that. We just have a smaller tolerance for what it takes to be with others. It means having to perform. I get so tired of communicating.
Anneli Rufus (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: rabbitinthemoon)

(Reblogged from montanaharper)

fuzzydefiance:

Johnny Cage, “Let’s dance”

(Reblogged from moonwasours)

moniquill:

meridok:

myradish:

aullidodecisne:

hyggehaven:

Chinampa (Nahuatlchināmitl [tʃiˈnaːmitɬ]) is a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture which used small, rectangular areas of fertile arable land to grow crops on the shallow lake beds in the Valley of Mexico.

Sometimes referred to as “floating gardens,” chinampas were artificial islands that usually measured roughly 98 ft × 8.2 ft (30 m × 2.5 m).[1] Chinampas were used by the ancient Aztec [Aboriginal Peoples].[2] In Tenochtitlan, the chinampas ranged from 300 ft × 15 ft (91 m × 4.6 m)[1] to 300 ft × 30 ft (91 m × 9.1 m)[1][3] They were created by staking out the shallow lake bed and then fencing in the rectangle with wattle. The fenced-off area was then layered with mud, lake sediment, and decaying vegetation, eventually bringing it above the level of the lake. Often trees such as āhuexōtl [aːˈweːʃoːt͡ɬ] (Salix bonplandiana)[2] (a willow) and āhuēhuētl [aːˈweːweːt͡ɬ] (Taxodium mucronatum)[4] (a cypress) were planted at the corners to secure the chinampa. Chinampas were separated by channels wide enough for a canoe to pass. These “islands” had very high crop yields with up to 7 crops a year.[5]

photo:  Iraun permakultura (1), Aztec Chinampas model by Te Mahi, Photographer: Te Papa, © Te Papa (2)

Chinampas.

Indigenous technology

I love how somehow once its native people like the Aztecs, the 1400s become “ancient”. Cause if I’m not mistaken the chinampas were used into the early 1509s at least. If we were talking about Europeans we’d be saying “medieval” or maybe “Renaissance”.

Meridok’s tags:

(Reblogged from ladyvyola)

Behind every fanfic update, there is a writer being turned into THIS as they await your reactions

moonblossom:

jomosbanana:

image

Never before has a cat gif so succinctly summed up my emotions.

(Source: dapperbanana)

(Reblogged from moonwasours)

otp: riley neal + wind

(Source: universal-change)

(Reblogged from josh-hollloway)